Discovered in Abruzzo a footprint of the largest bipedal dinosaur ever documented in Italy

Questo contenuto è bloccato perche potrebbe utilizzare cookie per i quali occorre il tuo consenso. Pertanto leggi l'informativa sui cookie nel banner in alto. Se chiudi questo avviso acconsenti all'uso dei cookie.  
Questo contenuto è bloccato perche potrebbe utilizzare cookie per i quali occorre il tuo consenso. Pertanto leggi l'informativa sui cookie nel banner in alto. Se chiudi questo avviso acconsenti all'uso dei cookie.  

facebook twitter instagram vimeo youtube google+ linkedin

Dinosauri teropodi - Ph. Dariusz Sankowski | Public domain

Dinosauri teropodi – Ph. Dariusz Sankowski | Public domain

by Editorial Staff

italiaA new Lower Cretaceous (lower Aptian) dinosaur tracksite, from the eastern side of Monte Cagno have been discovered recently in Abruzzo, Italy. Different styles of track formation are represented on the site surface. Most of the footprints are preserved as deep tracks, produced by trackmakers sinking into soft mud. Some tracks, better preserved than the others, are characterized by metatarsal impressions and were interpreted as the resting traces of a crouching theropod (based on their orientation and three- dimensional morphology).

The calcareous scarp of Monte Cagno, the place where the footprints were discovered - Ph. INGV

The calcareous scarp of Monte Cagno, the place where the footprints were discovered – Ph. INGV

The 135 cm length of the track with metatarsal impressions indicates huge pedal proportions and represents the largest theropod trackmaker ever documented from the Mesozoic peri-Adriatic platforms of Italy. The discovery was made by a group of scholars of the Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) and “La Sapienza” University of Rome. The results of the study were published on the scientific journal Cretaceous Research (Elsevier).

Map of the ancient supercontinent Pangea with Laurasia and Gondwana. It represents the structure of the continental masses and ocean basins at the age of the dinosaurs - Image source

Continental drift, the movement of the Earth’s continents relative to each other, thus appearing to “drift” across the ocean basin. Map of the ancient supercontinent Pangea with Laurasia and Gondwana. It represents the structure of the continental masses and ocean basins at the age of the dinosaurs – Image source

 
latuapubblicita2
 

  • Questo contenuto è bloccato perche potrebbe utilizzare cookie per i quali occorre il tuo consenso. Pertanto leggi l'informativa sui cookie nel banner in alto. Se chiudi questo avviso acconsenti all'uso dei cookie.  
  • Questo contenuto è bloccato perche potrebbe utilizzare cookie per i quali occorre il tuo consenso. Pertanto leggi l'informativa sui cookie nel banner in alto. Se chiudi questo avviso acconsenti all'uso dei cookie.  
  • Questo contenuto è bloccato perche potrebbe utilizzare cookie per i quali occorre il tuo consenso. Pertanto leggi l'informativa sui cookie nel banner in alto. Se chiudi questo avviso acconsenti all'uso dei cookie.  
    Questo contenuto è bloccato perche potrebbe utilizzare cookie per i quali occorre il tuo consenso. Pertanto leggi l'informativa sui cookie nel banner in alto. Se chiudi questo avviso acconsenti all'uso dei cookie.  

Rispondi

Il tuo indirizzo e-mail non sarà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono segnalati *

*

10 − 10 =

È possibile utilizzare questi tag ed attributi XHTML: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Torna su